HELLYEAH

Lynchburg Concerts Presents

HELLYEAH

KYNG, Cane Hill

Fri 7.28.17

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Phase 2

Lynchburg, VA

$23.00 - $54.50

This event is 18 and over

HELLYEAH
HELLYEAH
HELLYEAH’s previous album, 2014’s Blood for Blood, was the album metal fans and critics were waiting for HELLYEAH to make, based on the revered metal pedigree of the individual members. Such an artistic achievement—the album debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Hard Rock album chart— meant the band set the bar incredibly high. HELLYEAH —whose core is comprised of singer Chad Gray, guitarist Tom Maxwell, drummer Vinnie Paul, Christian Brady (guitar) and Kyle Sanders (bass)— do not disappoint with their fifth album UNDEN!ABLE.

“We turned a corner with Blood for Blood and we wanted to continue that path,” Paul states. “It’s much heavier and darker, and we take it to another extreme.” The album also fosters a sense of community and the notion that “we’re all in this together” among the metal community we are part of. The upside down “i” in the title is an exclamation point — a subtle indicator of how metal fans live their lives against the grain for their entire daily existence. “It doesn’t matter how old you are — you are always a metal kid,” Chad Gray declares, referencing himself and fans as one.

With the 2007 self-titled debut, HELLYEAH broke the ice, introducing the world to a band comprised of familiar faces who played in influential bands with signature sounds. 2010’s Stampede showed off a more pleasure-seeking side of HELLYEAH. 2012’s Band of Brothers was marked by internal change and further experimentation, while Blood for Blood found the band reaching the summit of brutality, creativity, and artfully mined piss and vinegar. UNDEN!ABLE is the logical next step and it’s frontloaded with songs that crackle with a palpable industrial aggro energy. As guitarist Maxwell succinctly says, “It’s belligerent and brutal, with peaks and valleys that bring you up and down, emotionally and lyrically.”

One reason it’s so belligerent and brutal? The time crunch that came along with crafting the album. The band spent 18 glorious but grueling months on the road in support of Blood for Blood and was given exactly two weeks (!!!) off before it had to start working on UNDEN!ABLE. The pressure and lack of recess awakened a sleeping giant within Maxwell. There was literally no time to waste and he marshalled his emotions for inspiration.

Without any time to decompress, Maxwell came out of the gates in sniper mode, admitting there was “no time for demo-itis!” He confessed, “I was pissed, agitated, and distraught. In the long run, it helped. There was so much intensity in the frustration.” Paul notes that the band “took no time off so that we didn’t get complacent. We knew there was a window of opportunity.” It may not have been optimal at the time, but it yielded a maximized result. “We know we did great, broken ankles and all,” he states. HELLYEAH’s usual formula remained unaltered when it came to the recording process. They demoed at Paul’s home studio in Dallas, TX before writing and recording with Kevin Churko in Las Vegas.

UNDEN!ABLE hosts redemptive, but throttling songs that will “scratch your soul,” according to Gray. “X” is fast, furious and “over the top,” says Paul. “It is something that metal fans need.” It’s expected to become an instant fan favorite. The more contemplative “Human” is moving, yet monstrous. The title track surges with raw energy and industrial crunch. “Love Falls” is a rhythmic and sultry departure for the band, which measures pain and anger equally, while “STARTARIOT” is nothing short of a fist-pumping, fuel-burning heavy metal epic.

UNDEN!ABLE is a complete work, including a cover that is the definitive visual matching the album’s sonic wrath. The artwork was inspired by Chad Gray and designed by William “Wombat” Felch, who the band discovered through his artistic interpretations of HELLYEAH songs on YouTube, and who Paul labeled “like a new member of the band.” The eye is emblematic of the metal community and the kids who find their kindred spirits in HELLYEAH. “The eyes are the portal to the soul,” Gray says. “There is more extremity, so I wanted it to represent looking into the eye of someone who is a member of the metal community being cast out. You always feel like a fighter. So we created this eye and the exclamation point [in the title] as the stamp on this madness. You are looking into the soul of a metalhead.”

Overall, there’s a surging current of hunger in UNDEN!ABLE. The members have had success in the past, but they’re not satisfied with all they have done. “It’s all I know,” Paul muses about what keeps him manning the kit and making new music, despite a career so illustrious that no one would fault him if he chose to hang up the sticks. “I could have quit and could be playing golf. Being a traveling musician? That fuels me. I have a true passion and belief in HELLYEAH and heavy metal music.”

Gray concludes, “We’re all in this together. We are metal fans first and foremost. We play off each other every night with our metal family. As a metal kid, I’d go to shows because I needed the release. Being on the other side now, I need this as bad as the fans do. I need to hit that deck every day and give everything I can.” The divide between HELLYEAH and their fans has been erased with UNDEN!ABLE. It’s an album made for the metal community, by the metal community.
KYNG
KYNG
Kyng find grandiosity in simplicity. The Los Angeles outfit may only boast three members—Eddie Veliz [vocals/guitar], Pepe Clarke [drums], and Tony Castaneda [bass/backup vocals]—but their collective roar could easily tip the Southern California Richter Scale. On their second full-length album and first for Razor & Tie, Burn The Serum, the trio harks back to the essence of heavy rock 'n' roll, forging thunderous percussion to lightning hot riffs driven by a divine vocal howl. At the same time, they keep their eyes wide open towards the future.

Breaking out of the City of Angels in 2011, the group's debut Trampled Sun landed shining critical acclaim for its "California Heavy" sound merging the metallic meanderings of Soundgarden and Queens of the Stone Age with the timeless scope of Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin. They hit the road with everybody from The Sword and Clutch to Trivium and Megadeth—even being picked to play at Metallica's first-ever Orion Music + More festival. However, everything was merely leading up to Burn The Serum.

"We literally started working on Burn The Serum as soon as we finished the first album," says Veliz. "We built on the foundation we had. It's a balance of heavy riffing and these big melodic vocals. It sits between metal and a rock 'n' roll. You can't put your finger on it. It's just what Kyng does."
To preserve what "Kyng does", the band joined producers Jim Rota of Fireball Ministry fame and Andrew Alekel at Grandmaster Studios in Los Angeles during early 2013. The production team encouraged the musicians to unfurl this unbridled energy further.

"Working with them was a blast," the frontman goes on. "These dudes literally know anything and everything you need to know about this kind of music. They can point out exact tones recorded on Bark At The Moon. It was a learning experience for us. They helped us refine the sound, pulling things back and keeping it as tasteful as possible. It's very musical as a result."

The first single "Electric Halo" serves as shining proof. The guitar buzzes with an ominous wall of distortion before lighting up a soaring refrain that hits impressive heights and showcases the vocalist's dynamic range.

"When we were writing it, we asked, 'What would Tony Iommi do?'," laughs Veliz. "That was the mindset. Lyrically, it's about those people you meet who will be the sweetest little things to your face, but they turn around and stab you in the back. They turn on that halo of sweetness to get what they need from you. Once they turn it off, they're no longer angels. Instead, they cut you and stab you in the name of what they can take for themselves."

With more robust riff-age and pummeling drums, "Sewn Shut" tells a harrowing true story of a friend whose eyes were literally sewed closed after a horrific accident, while "In The Land of Pigs" serves as an account of the trials and tribulations of the music industry and life on the road. Expanding in cinematic fashion, the title track decrees a plea to an addict with a vibrant visual.

"It initially came from this crazy argument I had in my family life," reveals Veliz. "It was a tough one to write because it was really personal. This is the story. Someone's blatantly addicted to something. It's breaking them in half and making them fall apart. You ask them for the truth, and they can't say it. Everything is destroyed and this person doesn't care."

That heaviness remains encoded in the group's very moniker. "In the beginning, Kyng was just a name," the singer concludes. "Now, it's about honesty in music though. We try to be honest with ourselves so people want to listen to us for a long time to come. We want to take you back to an older era when bands didn't need all of the bells and whistles. At the same time, we're taking you down our own path to that place."
Cane Hill
Venue Information:
Phase 2
4009 Murray Pl.
Lynchburg, VA, 24501
http://phase2club.com/